English Practice Questions for IBPS Exams 2017

Mentor for Bank Exams
English Practice Questions for IBPS Exams 2017
Dear Readers,
Welcome to Mentor for Bank Exams English Practice Questions Section. The below practice questions covers Reading comprehension (10 Questions), Cloze Test (10 Questions), Theme Based Deduction (5 questions). All the Best for Upcoming IBPS Exams 2017.
Directions (1 – 10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
A major problem of Indian industrial and commercial development was the supply of capital. Until 1850, British capital was shy of Indian adventure. The risks and unknown factors were too great, and prospects in other directions too bright. The working capital of the agency house after 1813 at first consisted mainly of the savings of the Company’s servants. Their cries of woe when these houses fell as in the crisis of 1831 were loud and poignant. Indian capital was also shy for different reasons. It needed to acquire confidence in the new regime, and outside the presidency towns, to acquire confidence in the new regime, and outside the presidency towns, to acquire the habit of investment. Investment for large scale production for ‘enabling’ works like railways was an unfamiliar and suspected practice. Thus, the first big development came when European capital was coaxed into the country by government guarantees or went of its own free will to develop industries with which it was already familiar as in the case of jute or coal. Indian capital followed where it was in touch with European practice as in Bombay (Mumbai) and dealing with familiar products like cotton. These considerations throw into all the greater relief the achievement of the Tata’s in developing iron and steel. Thus, the major part of the capital provided was British which a steadily increasing Indian proportion from 1900. As late as 1931-32 the capital of companies registered abroad was nearly four times that of companies registered in India. But this is not an exact guide because it leaves out of account the stock in British companies held by Indians, as well as government stocks. Speaking plainly, it may be said that the capital of the cotton industry was mainly Indian, that of the iron and steel industry entirely so, that of the jute industry about half and half, while the coal and plantation industries were mainly British, together with that used for the building of railways, irrigation, and other public works. Management in the cotton and steel industries was mainly Indian though European technicians were freely employed, that of the jute, coal, and the plantation industries being European, the jute men in particular being Scotch. Their capital, apart of course from government enterprise, operated thorough joint-stock companies and managing agencies. The latter arose through the convenience found by bodies of capitalists seeking to develop some new activities and lacking any Indian experience, of operating through local agents. It arose in the period after 1813 when private merchants took over the trade formerly monopolized by the Company. The money world be found in Britain to promote a tea garden, a coal mine, or a jute mill, but the management would be confided to a firm already on the spot. The managing agency was the hyphen connecting capital with experience and local knowledge.
Until 1914 the policy of the government continued in the main to be one of ‘enabling’ private capital and enterprise to develop the country. Direct promotion was confined to public utilities like canals and railways. The line between enabling and interfering action became distinctly blurred, however, in the case of the cotton industry and there was a tendency for enabling action to pass over into the positive promotion of particular projects. This was most noticeable in the time of Lord Curzon with his establishment of an imperial department of agriculture with a research station at Pusa and a department of commerce and industry presided over by a sixth member of the Viceroy’s Council. The First World War began the transition to a new period of active promotion and positive support. As the conflict lengthened there arose a demand for Indian manufactured goods. India failed to take full advantage of this opportunity, partly because of uncertainty as to the future and partly because the means for sudden expansion were lacking. The outcome of this situation was the appointment of an industrial commission in 1916, under pressure from London. The commission criticized the unequal development of Indian industry which had led to the missing of her, war opportunity. A much closer cooperation with industry was planned through provincial departments of industry. Increased technical training and technical assistance to industry was proposed while it was suggested that the central government should set up a stores department which should aim at making India self-suffcing in this respect. The commission’s report was only partially implemented, but a stores department and provincial industrial departments were created and something was done towards promoting technical assistance. The importance of the report and its aftermath was that it marked the transition from the conception of Indian economy in broadly colonial terms with freedom for private enterprise to the conception of India as an autonomous economic unit.
1. The following can be inferred from the passage:
A. Industrial development of a country requires supply of external capital.
B. Investment in uncertain industries is more when government provides guarantees against failure.
C. Lack of indigenous technical expertise cab be a constraining factor in a country’s economic development.
D. Enabling infrastructure like railways would have to be provided necessarily by the government.
E. Marked development for the final products is a important prerequisite for industrial development.
A) A and B
B) A, C and D
C) B, C and E
D) C, D and E
E) A, B, C and E

2. The first capitalists investing in Indian economy were
A) the Indians
B) predominantly the British
C) the Europeans except the British
D) Both (A) and (B)
E) Both (A) and (C)
3. After the start of the first World War, all of the following could be likely reasons for the British government adopting a proactive stance towards Indian industry except.
A) The major investors in Indian enterprises were British and they had missed out on an opportunity.
B) The war had created a huge demand for industrial goods.
C) The British government wanted economic development of the country ad India was strategic economically in the war.
D) The development of Indian economy was required for contributing towards the war effort.
E) The desire to see India as self-sufficient in technical expertise.
4. During the early twentieth century, Indians were restricted to making investment in stocks of companies that were necessarily listed in India. This was done with the aim of confining Indian capital to India so that it could not compete with British capital.
A) Definitely true as inferred from the passage.
B) It was true on a selective case by case basis.
C) This was the fact during the early part of the British rule.
D) This was true in the later part of the British rule.
E) No evidence to support the same is given in the passage.
5. From the passage it can be inferred that during the early part of twentieth century, starting a greenfield project was more difficult for an Indian capitalist than for an European.
A) Definitely true as inferred from the passage.
B) It was true on a selective case by case basis.
C) No trend of discrimination between the two categories of capitalists can be inferred from the passage.
D) Preference was given to British capitalists, buffeted by the fact that the country was under British rule.
E) Preference was given to European capitalists.
6. From this passage, it can be inferred that one of the problem that could have cropped up in the early stages of industrialization might have been.
A) government interference in day-to-day operations of business.
B) equitable sharing of risks between domestic and foreign investors.
C) ensuring adequate working capital.
D) regulation of the stock markets to protect investors from dubious enterprises.
E) the alignment of interest of the capitalists and the management
7. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the work/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage. PROSPECTS
A) Feasibility
B) Implausibility
C) Concomitant
D) Antiquated
E) Erstwhile
8. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage. COAXED
A) Obviate
B) Despondent
C) Conniving
D) Inveigle
E) Collude
9. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in passage CONFIDED
A) Enervate
B) Analogue
C) Credence
D) Certitude
E) Incredulity
10. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in passage. AUTONOMOUS
A) Sovereign
B) potentate
C) maverick
D) nonconformist
E) Protégé
Directions (11 – 20): In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful. 
On social media recently there have been comments on the spate of avalanche casualties of the Army in Gurez valley and Sonamarg areas of Kashmir. People wished 11.(in) know why the Army was reluctant to 12.(Open) areas which were vulnerable to avalanches in the high-altitude terrain. If not permanently, then at least for the winter when dangers from avalanches exist; the same 13.( will)re-occupied later as the weather improves. Responses were quick, bringing out the essential facts about the LoC and the necessity for maintaining its sanctity through physical 14.(residence). The “Kargil syndrome” isn't a term used in social media but responses 15.( remind)mostly to that broad understanding. It goes back to the days when the Army suffered a “walk-in” by Pakistani troops, into winter-vacated areas of Kargil, Dras and Batalik sectors in the winter of 1998-99. The Army suffered a heavy 16.(mix) of casualties in recovering these through conventional 17.(invasion) at obnoxious heights in the next summer. On hindsight, the Army is obviously playing it extremely safe. It has minimized winter vacation and 18.(dropped) little to chance. Obviously, lesser the vacation in winter greater will be the casualties. How does this policy work and is their scope for more pragmatism through execution of winter vacation as part of winter redeployment? These are 19.(uncertain) questions Indian citizens will ask as they get better informed on matters strategic. More technology is available for drone, helicopter, unattended sensor and satellite-based surveillance which 20.( little) consider as alternatives.
11. a) From b) For c) to d) be e) No change required.
12. a) Clear b) Vacate c) Discharge d) Depart e) No change required.
13. a) Would be b) could be c) have been d) must be e) No change required.
14. a) being b) Presence c) Latency d) Company e) No change required.
15. a) Alluded b) Told c) applied d) leak e) No change required.
16. a) Toll b) Rate c) Charge d) Estimate e) No change required.
17. a) pain b) push c) assaults d) advance e) No change required.
18. a) deserted b) alone c) left d) parted e) No change required.
19. a) binding b) sure c) inevitable d) fateful e) No change required.
20. a) much b) few c) a few d) many e) No change required
Directions (21 – 25): Five statements are given below, labelled A, B, C, D and E. Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage.
21.
A) Adaptation occurs in response to changes in the environment, life style, or relationship to other organisms.
B) Desert plants (xerophytes) and animals (xerocoles) face three challenges: getting moisture, conserving moisture, and defending oneself from biotic and abiotic factors.
C) Organisms that are not suitably adapted to their environment will either have to move out of the habitat or die out.
D) While adaptations provide for the individual purpose of the organism—survival, reproduction, development, maintenance—these same characteristics provide diversity and add to human fascination with, and enjoyment of, nature.
E) Furthermore, while adaptations often are seen as a static set of suitable characteristics, in reality the process of developing adaptations is a dynamic process.
22.
A) Bacteria are a group of microscopic, single-celled prokaryotes—that is, organisms characterized by a lack of a nucleus or any other membrane-bound organelles.
B) Although among the most primitive organisms, bacteria reflect many universal features of life.
C) Bacteria are often viewed negatively, given this group's connection to diseases.
D) The first formal classification scheme for bacteria originated following the development of the Gram stain by Hans Christian Gram.
E) Bacteria are the most abundant of all organisms. They are ubiquitous in both soil and water and as symbionts of other organisms.
23.
A) This term itself derives from the Greek aspharagos or asparagos, although some believe the Greek term originated from foreign sources, likely from the Persian asparag, meaning "sprout" or "shoot."
B) There are up to 300 species in Asparagus, all from the Old World.
C) Members of Asparagus range from herbs to somewhat woody climbers.
D) Other species of Asparagus are grown as ornamental plants.
E) Asparagus can be grown from seeds, but is more commonly grown by purchasing three to four year old roots or "rhizomes."
24.
A) Bacon may be eaten fried, baked, or grilled, or used as a minor ingredient to flavor dishes.
B) Despite having high fat content and relatively low protein count, the delicious, unique flavor of bacon ensures its place as an attractive and popular food.
C) Bacon has one of the highest fat contents of any cut of meat.
D) However, bacon also has a unique, smoky flavor that continues to prove attractive, assuring its place as a favorite food for many occasions.
E) In the twelfth century, a church in the English town of Dunmow promised a side of bacon to any married man who could swear before the congregation and God that he had not quarreled with his wife for a year and a day.
25.
A) Dogs presently make up only a small percentage of animals used in research; rats and mice far outnumber them.
B) The dog is usually considered to be humankind's first, and perhaps most important, domestic animal.
C) The trainability, devotion, playfulness, and ability to fit into human households have earned dogs a unique position in the realm of interspecies relationships.
D) Conversely, dogs seem to view their human companions as members of their pack, and make few, if any, distinctions between their owners and fellow dogs.
E) Dogs have lived and worked with humans in so many roles that their loyalty has earned them the unique sobriquet, "man's best friend."
Solutions:
1. C) B, C and E [ first sentence of the passage).]
2. D) Both (A) and (B)
3. E) [Refer the fifth sentence onwards of the second paragraph.]
4. E) No evidence to support the same is given in the passage.
5. C) – [Refer towards the last part of the first paragraph]
6. C) ensuring adequate working capital.
7. A) Feasibility[Prospect means the possibility or likelihood of some future event occurring.]
8. D) Inveigle[Coaxed means persuade (someone) gradually or gently to do something.]
9. E) Incredulity [Confided means trust (someone) enough to tell them of a secret or private matter.]
10. E) Protégé[Autonomous means having the freedom to act independently hence Protégé is the word most opposite in meaning.]
11. C)   12. B)   13. B)   14. B)   15. A)   16. A)   17. C)   18. C)   19. C)   20. D)  
21. B) Desert plants (xerophytes) and animals (xerocoles) face three challenges: getting moisture, conserving moisture, and defending oneself from biotic and abiotic factors. The answer to this is statement 'B.' Every other statement speaks about Adaptation and its effects. While 'B' speaks about the issues faced by desert plants and animals.
22. D) The first formal classification scheme for bacteria originated following the development of the Gram stain by Hans Christian Gram. The answer to this is statement 'D.' The other statements speaks about the characteristics of Bacteria while 'D' is about the classification scheme By Hans Gram.
23. A) This term itself derives from the Greek aspharagos or asparagos, although some believe the Greek term originated from foreign sources, likely from the Persian asparag, meaning "sprout" or "shoot." The answer to this is statement 'A.' The statements are about the qualities of Asparagus. The first statement is the meaning of the word 'Asparagus.'
24. E) The answer to this is statement 'E.' All the statements reflect the qualities of bacon. Statement 'E' is about the history of the phrase 'Bringing home the bacon.'
25. A) Dogs presently make up only a small percentage of animals used in research; rats and mice far outnumber them. The answer to this is statement 'A.' The others are centered around dogs relationships with humans. The first sentence is about research on dogs.